Social Emotional Learning plays a major part in our overall well-being.
Our Great Impact Program can help.

Our framework provides the building blocks to build skills for successful relationships, resolving conflict, problem solving and self-advocating.

Today’s educators and students carry so much on their shoulders. Meeting academic and social expectations – and simply growing up and developing a sense of self and belonging – can be tough. Yet the pressures in today’s educational environment reach far beyond these basics. Our world is moving and changing faster than ever.

Anxiety-  Nearly 1 in 3 adolescents will meet criteria for an anxiety disorder by the age of 18. 
Trauma-  46% of all children have experienced at least one adverse childhood experience (ACE). 
 Distraction- On average, teens spend 5 hours a day on digital entertainment, excluding school work. 
Isolation- Nearly 40% of high school seniors report that they often feel lonely and left out.

Our Educators 
Stress- 61% of teachers report being stressed out.
Mental Health-This is an increasing issue in schools today
Burnout- Public school educators are quitting their jobs at the highest rate on record.


"A growing body of science, including the work of Harvard University’s Center for the Developing Child, has found that toxic stress can impede healthy development, literally changing children’s brains and affecting their capacity to absorb even the best instruction."

Dr Robert Block

Harvard University

“When you work with children, it’s really easy to ignore our own needs,” said Brown. “Mindfulness has given me a greater sense of balance and calm, which is a benefit to the other people around me.”

Alan Brown

Founder of Learning to Thrive

“My practice is always evolving, and the kids I work with know that sometimes I need to stop and take a minute for myself,” said Waugh. While it’s a little trickier teaching high school kids, Waugh says they are respectful and know they don’t have to participate but they need to cooperate. “They’ll tell me they know it helps them, on the sports field or remembering lines in a play, and I’m glad they have a skill for when they just want to have a little space.”

Rosie Waugh

Mclean School

Mental health and wellness affects our overall well-being. It affects how we think, feel and react to situations. It is the connection between mind, body and spirit, which determines how we handle stress, relate to others and make choices. Mental health and wellness is important at every stage of life, from infancy to adulthood.

Dr. Christina Ryan

Pediatrics, Saint Barnabas Hospital

Effective teaching of mindfulness is critical to the future of young Australians. Research shows that mindfulness has a profound effect on student and staff well being.

Leadership Qualitiies

Clarifying setting, and reaffirming intentions.


Cultivating a witnessing awareness


Strengthening self-regulation


Stabilising attention


Practicing loving-kindness

Core Competencies

  • The Five Core Skills of mindfulness—setting intentions, cultivating awareness, stabilising attention, self-regulation, nurturing loving kindness—that form the foundation of transformative mindfulness practices
    Key neuroscience insights such as the effective drivers of neuroplasticity and implicit memory that are critical to changing the brain
    How to identify and transform clients’ unhealthy core negative beliefs and patterns by teaching an accessible brain-changing mindfulness practice

Studies find that youth benefit from learning mindfulness in terms of improved cognitive outcomes, social-emotional skills, and well being. In turn, such benefits may lead to long-term improvements in life. For example, social skills in kindergarten predict improved education, employment, crime, substance abuse and mental health outcomes in adulthood19. Research finds that youth who practice mindfulness can develop

Benefits for Educators

When teachers learn mindfulness, they not only reap personal benefits such as reduced stress and burnout15 but their schools do as well. In randomised controlled trials, teachers who learned mindfulness experienced:

Reduced stress and burnout
Greater efficacy in doing their jobs
More emotionally supportive classrooms
Better classroom management

Benefits for Students

Studies find that youth benefit from learning mindfulness in terms of improved cognitive outcomes, social-emotional skills, and well being. In turn, such benefits may lead to long-term improvements in life. For example, social skills in kindergarten predict improved education, employment, crime, substance abuse and mental health outcomes in adulthood. Research finds that youth who practice mindfulness can develop:

Social & Emotional Skills

Behaviour in school
Empathy & perspective taking
Social-skills

Attention & Learning Skills

Attention & Focus
Cognitive development

Resilience

Emotional regulation
Reduced anxiety & stress
Post-traumatic symptoms
Depression